Tales of Justice

Criminal Justice Course Spotlight: Victimology

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

Much can be learned about criminal minds and motives from studying, yes, the criminals themselves, but also their victims. This study is known as Victimology. Wayne Pretherick, Associate Professor of Criminology at Bond University in Australia writes, “Victimology is important in the overall investigative process because it not only tells us who the victims were, […]

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White House proposed budget highlights Criminal Justice fields

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

How the federal government allocates budget resources and sets policy priorities can have a big impact on jobs and career tracks for Criminal Justice students. A look at the Office of the President draft of a proposed 2016 National Budget offers a glimpse of that spending and priorities, including Criminal Justice reform. “The president is […]

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Innocent until proven guilty, evidence and the burden of proof

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

While it’s clear that evidence is a crucial aspect to every criminal investigation, the rules regarding collection, storage and handling of evidence, its grounds and weight in court and other procedures are much more complex. In the United States — where criminal suspects are innocent until proven guilty — the burden of proof is on […]

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Who’s Hiring? Positive Outlook for Criminal Justice Careers

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

College students close to graduating are entering the workforce in arguably the most optimistic time since the Recession. Hiring data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows growth in almost every area of the economy — an average of 11 percent. The role of Americans with criminal justice background — an understanding of the […]

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10 Tips for Getting Ahead in Criminal Justice

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

We’ve mentioned before the various jobs criminal justice administration students can look forward to with their bachelor’s degree, and that list is nowhere near exhaustive. But when we look into long lists like these, or see some of the nation’s top policymakers, police chiefs and more — people succeeding in careers we dream of one […]

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The line between actual crime-solving and its mega-representation on TV

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

Crime has been the subject of popular culture — from art and literature to television and movies — since the beginning of, well, crime. Complex murder mysteries and engaging crime-solving thrillers from Sherlock Holmes to CSI have not only captivated audiences, but assisted young people in discovering their future careers. This, then, leaves a thick, […]

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Corporate Crime and Punishment

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

While television dramas give many Alvernia students interested in a Criminal Justice Administration  degree at least a passing sense of street-level criminal activity, the world of “white collar” crime remains largely unseen by average Americans. Coined in 1939 by sociologist Edwin Sutherland, white collar crime describes “a range of frauds committed by business and government […]

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The role of Criminal Justice in Computer Forensics

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

Just in this last year, retailers like Home Depot, Target and others, as well as banks like JP Morgan Chase have been victims of the theft of important customer information through their data networks by hackers. Now more than ever, the role of computer forensics – the growing specialization in the detection and prevention of […]

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Wrongful conviction in the Pennsylvania Criminal Justice System

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

Wrongful conviction. Two words that strike at the heart of a long held cultural assumption in the majority population of the United States — that we only convict the guilty. But two decades of focus on the issue of wrongful conviction by a number of organizations — including many affiliated with colleges — remind us […]

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Will New York’s criminal justice system redefine youth offenders?

  • Alvernia Criminal Justice

New York is one of only two states (North Carolina) in the country that prosecutes 16-year-olds as adults. And research has shown that brain development in teenage boys is slower, and they specifically lack impulse control. Groundbreaking research in recent years clearly shows major brain development continues until about age 25, and, in many respects, […]

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