Tales of Justice

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Advances in criminal justice technology increase accuracy, accountability and efficiency

It’s an interesting time to be a bachelor’s degree student in Criminal Justice Administration as universities are often at the front of the line to learn about the technological advances in criminal justice. Whether it’s in victimology, DNA testing, computer forensics or other classes, virtually every course a criminal justice student takes will include new […]

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Reducing recidivism through education opportunities

Criminal Justice experts have reported that one solution to recidivism — a person’s relapse into criminal behavior after they have been released from prison — is educational opportunities to inmates, including substance abuse treatment, life skills training, networking and education (high school (GED) programs, trade school, even associate’s and bachelor’s programs). From 1972 to 1995, […]

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Multicultural issues in Criminal Justice

The U.S. has always been a place that has attracted people from all over the world. Consequently, demographics are always changing. Because of the diverse nation, with cultures differing from town to town, community policing holds a dual purpose —maintaining order and building communities. Those in criminal justice field must be aware of the cultures […]

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Women and the Criminal Justice System

Alvernia Criminal Justice course CJ 216 Women in the Criminal Justice system is a bachelor’s degree course that reviews history, equity issues and more, looking at women in different roles, both as offenders and employees, as well as their role in victimology. When it comes to employment differences between men and women, deeply rooted historical […]

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Top Criminal Justice nonprofits

Criminal Justice students pursue careers working for various parts of government — the public defender’s office, police forces, in policy and more. But there are also a number of rewarding careers in non-profits that hold criminal justice-centered missions and play a vital role in criminal justice. Non-profits work to solve problems across the entire area […]

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Innocent until proven guilty, evidence and the burden of proof

While it’s clear that evidence is a crucial aspect to every criminal investigation, the rules regarding collection, storage and handling of evidence, its grounds and weight in court and other procedures are much more complex. In the United States — where criminal suspects are innocent until proven guilty — the burden of proof is on […]

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The line between actual crime-solving and its mega-representation on TV

Crime has been the subject of popular culture — from art and literature to television and movies — since the beginning of, well, crime. Complex murder mysteries and engaging crime-solving thrillers from Sherlock Holmes to CSI have not only captivated audiences, but assisted young people in discovering their future careers. This, then, leaves a thick, […]

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Corporate Crime and Punishment

While television dramas give many Alvernia students interested in a Criminal Justice Administration  degree at least a passing sense of street-level criminal activity, the world of “white collar” crime remains largely unseen by average Americans. Coined in 1939 by sociologist Edwin Sutherland, white collar crime describes “a range of frauds committed by business and government […]

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Wrongful conviction in the Pennsylvania Criminal Justice System

Wrongful conviction. Two words that strike at the heart of a long held cultural assumption in the majority population of the United States — that we only convict the guilty. But two decades of focus on the issue of wrongful conviction by a number of organizations — including many affiliated with colleges — remind us […]

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Will New York’s criminal justice system redefine youth offenders?

New York is one of only two states (North Carolina) in the country that prosecutes 16-year-olds as adults. And research has shown that brain development in teenage boys is slower, and they specifically lack impulse control. Groundbreaking research in recent years clearly shows major brain development continues until about age 25, and, in many respects, […]

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